You Are Running A Hilly Race Course, and You May Just Get Hurt

Harbingers of spring in Cincinnati include the usual—temperatures in the 50’s, flowers making their way up from the ground, St. Patrick’s Day, and sunlight when driving home from work. Another sign of spring, specifically for me, revolves around this coming Sunday. This weekend is the unofficial start to road running race season with the city’s first big race, the beloved Heart Mini races. This Sunday morning, along with the smell of spring in the cool air, we will feel the collective breaths of hundreds of runners tackling the oft-underestimated course that is the Heart Mini Marathon and Half-Marathon. This is a hilly course, and time and time again we see a swath of injuries that proliferate from this weekend. For those using this race as preparation for the Flying Pig, an injury or start of a nagging ache after this race can derail your training plans.

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What To Do If You Get Injured Four Weeks Before Race Day

by Eric Oliver, PT, Founder

During the average training cycle running injuries begin to pop up during the later stages of training more so than at any other point.  By this time in the training program, your body has already endured through hundreds of thousands of steps, and if you have any movement faults, strength deficits, motor sequencing issues, running pattern faults, or issues in your training program your body is likely to react to them.  

Common symptoms of these deficiencies (small or large) include gradual build-up of aches and pains.  These symptoms do not feel the same as general post-workout fatigue or discomfort resulting from the activity.  These are the “this doesn’t feel right” kind of soreness, achiness, burning, jolts, zings, and sharp pains.  Many times these pains don’t gradually build-up, though.  Rather they can come out of nowhere, piercing at your muscle or joint like a hot knife.  In either case, both scenarios will bring your training to a halt or at the least a snails pace. 

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"Why Don't You Accept Insurance?"

By: Eric Oliver, PT, Founder, President

“Why don’t you accept insurance?”  This is a common question directed to my business in response to our policy of not billing health insurance for our physical therapy (PT) services.  Rather, we provide a bill to the client for them to send off to their insurance.  This puts the responsibility of getting reimbursed onto the client.  Yes, this saves us money because we are not paying a staff member to handle the insurance reimbursement side of the business, but to fully understand why BE doesn’t hassle with billing your health insurance requires you to know a little more about my PT story.

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BE's Top 3 Cycling Injuries and Their Causes (Part 3)

by Dr. Jen Moehring-Schmidt, PT, DPT, OCS

IT Band Syndrome

Pain in the Iliotibial band (ITB) is a very common, and oftentimes, recurrent complaint of runners, cyclists, and triathletes.  The afflicted athlete will experience pain, sometimes sharp, anywhere along the ITB, which originates on the lateral aspect of the hip, traverses the length of the femur and inserts just below the knee on the outside.  Various muscles along the thigh blend into this thick connective tissue, adding to the complexity of this structure.  

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BE's Top 3 Cycling Injuries and Their Causes (Part 2)

by Dr. Jen Moehring-Schmidt, PT, DPT, OCS

Lower Back Discomfort

Perhaps the second most common complaint in cycling is lower back pain.  Many of our daily habits, such as sitting for eight or more hours a day, can compromise the correct position of the lumbar spine. Similarly, cycling places the lumbar spine in a forwardly—or flexed posture—and therefore can add stress to the ligaments, discs, muscles and vertebrae that encompass the lumbar spine.  

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BE's Top 3 Cycling Injuries and Their Causes (Part 1)

by Dr. Jen Moehring-Schmidt, PT, DPT, OCS

While the sport of cycling may not account for as many injuries as football, running, or gymnastics, riding a bike can still be guilty of causing some nagging aches and pains. Sometimes these can be frustrating enough to cause an athlete to reconsider cycling at all! 

Because cycling is primarily a non-impact, non weight-bearing sport, overuse injuries - in the absence of trauma - tend to be less frequent. However, due to the repetitive nature of the sport, cyclists are prone to experience some form of injury at any given time.  As intensity, frequency and duration increase, so do the chances of sustaining an overuse (non-traumatic) injury.  

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6 Steps for a Better Run in the Rain

by BE Sponsored Athlete, Amy Robillard

Spring is so exciting for many athletes. We can finally shake those winter blues- and a few layers- while enjoying the fresh air.  Unfortunately, this time of year also brings those dreaded spring showers, which can make for an uncomfortable workout if you’re not prepared.  

We asked two-time Flying Pig Marathon winner, Amy Robillard, for her top tips to survive spring splashes and sprinkles to keep you outside and on schedule.

If you’re dressing for a rainy run, here are some things to consider:

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Spring Is Here, And Running Injuries Are In Full Bloom

by Eric Oliver, PT, Founder

It’s that time of year again.  In Cincinnati, the Heart Mini Marathon opens the running season in mid-March challenging the local winter marathon and half-marathon training groups’ athletes to their first official race of the year’s season.  This race is used as a practice race that helps to propel the runner into the final six weeks of training in which many will see their biggest running distances of the training cycle.  It’s an exciting time because runners get the sense that they are nearing their the big day—Flying Pig day.  In my experience as a physical therapist in Cincinnati, this race has also proved to be a harbinger to the annual ramp-up of pre-Flying Pig injuries.  In light of this year’s rash of injuries coming through our facility, I want to shed some light onto this year’s trainees as they make the last push for the remainder of the training season.  

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How to Dress for Cold Weather Exercise

by BE Sponsored Athlete, Amy Robillard

Dressing for the weather can seem like an ever moving target, especially during the winter. No two cold days are exactly alike, depending on sun, humidity and of course your level of exertion. 

It’s important to stay warm, but not overheat, while layering without adding bulk to your movement. That’s not even taking into consideration the fact that winter conditions can change on a dime.

Below are my top four tips for dressing for your cold weather workout.

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