Posts tagged Physical Therapy
"Why Don't You Accept Insurance?"

By: Eric Oliver, PT, Founder, President

“Why don’t you accept insurance?”  This is a common question directed to my business in response to our policy of not billing health insurance for our physical therapy (PT) services.  Rather, we provide a bill to the client for them to send off to their insurance.  This puts the responsibility of getting reimbursed onto the client.  Yes, this saves us money because we are not paying a staff member to handle the insurance reimbursement side of the business, but to fully understand why BE doesn’t hassle with billing your health insurance requires you to know a little more about my PT story.

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What To Do If You Get Injured Four Weeks Before Race Day

by Eric Oliver, PT, Founder

During the average training cycle running injuries begin to pop up during the later stages of training more so than at any other point.  By this time in the training program, your body has already endured through hundreds of thousands of steps, and if you have any movement faults, strength deficits, motor sequencing issues, running pattern faults, or issues in your training program your body is likely to react to them.  

Common symptoms of these deficiencies (small or large) include gradual build-up of aches and pains.  These symptoms do not feel the same as general post-workout fatigue or discomfort resulting from the activity.  These are the “this doesn’t feel right” kind of soreness, achiness, burning, jolts, zings, and sharp pains.  Many times these pains don’t gradually build-up, though.  Rather they can come out of nowhere, piercing at your muscle or joint like a hot knife.  In either case, both scenarios will bring your training to a halt or at the least a snails pace. 

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Spring Is Here, And Running Injuries Are In Full Bloom

by Eric Oliver, PT, Founder

It’s that time of year again.  In Cincinnati, the Heart Mini Marathon opens the running season in mid-March challenging the local winter marathon and half-marathon training groups’ athletes to their first official race of the year’s season.  This race is used as a practice race that helps to propel the runner into the final six weeks of training in which many will see their biggest running distances of the training cycle.  It’s an exciting time because runners get the sense that they are nearing their the big day—Flying Pig day.  In my experience as a physical therapist in Cincinnati, this race has also proved to be a harbinger to the annual ramp-up of pre-Flying Pig injuries.  In light of this year’s rash of injuries coming through our facility, I want to shed some light onto this year’s trainees as they make the last push for the remainder of the training season.  

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