Personal Training

by Jason Adams

BACKGROUND

Client is an exercise enthusiast who injured her hips, knees, and low back during various exercise activities. After consulting her orthopedic doctor and being told that she would never be able to perform a loaded squat, she dropped out of her group class and began personal training. The first step was to assess and evaluate her physical abilities to build her baseline program.

EXAM RESULTS

During the assessment it was determined that pain in her knees would occur during the eccentric (sitting) phase of the squat and not during the concentric (standing) phase. Her posture also needed correction, targeting mid-back and core strength. The main positive of the exam results was her hip stability had been established from prior training. This gave us various lower body exercises to perform while correcting her squat position.

OUTCOME

After 8 weeks of private personal training and participating in multiple corrective exercise programs, the client was able to perform a loaded squat without knee pain. There haven’t been any setbacks and she continues to excel at a high level. Moving forward, we will assess and correct her movement patterns to keep injuries from reoccurring.

PLAN

As the client continues to progress with personal training, she will perform her corrective exercise program three times per week. The evaluation is ongoing, as new regimens are implemented. The goal is to remain pain-free, especially with activities of daily living.

CLIENT'S TESTIMONIAL

I started training with Jason after injuring my knee, hip and low back.
I loved going to classes but I was having trouble modifying the workouts to
suit my injuries. Jason has not only managed to develop workouts
that don’t cause me pain, they’ve actually helped me to heal!

I’ve worked with several different trainers over that last 10 years and Jason is by far the best. His knowledge of body mechanics is astounding and he’s always learning more. He is also extremely creative. If I can’t do a particular exercise because of pain, he can always figure out a way to work the same muscles safely.

Don’t let his low-key personality fool you! I work harder for Jason because I trust him to push me without yelling or asking me to go too far, too fast.

If you want to build strength and avoid injuries,
Jason will give you the knowledge and guidance to succeed.”

Triathlete With Knee Pain

by: Eric Oliver, PT

Background  

CLIENT is a triathlete actively training for both a 70.3 (half-Ironman) and 140.6 (full Ironman) triathlon.  His run training had been hampered for several weeks due to a chronically recurring pain in both his knees.  He had sought help elsewhere but without complete resolution of the problem.  CLIENT has had his running mechanics evaluated elsewhere.

Exam Results

CLIENT was found to exhibit symptoms of inflammation of his patellar tendons, otherwise known as patellar tendinitis or "jumper's knee".  Strength was not an issue in the muscles of his hips or knees.  It was found that he did have tissue mobility restrictions in his thighs.  Additionally, slow motion video analysis showed him to have a long step length and low step cadence (steps per minute).

CLIENT finishing 2nd in his age-group recently.  Ran pain-free.

CLIENT finishing 2nd in his age-group recently.  Ran pain-free.

Outcome

CLIENT was given home exercises to normalize the mobility and flexibility of his quadriceps.  He was also given specific running drills to facilitate a lower impact force to the knee as well as resistance exercises to prepare his body for the changes in his running form.  He was also given personalized technique coaching on the treadmill and was guided with how to implement the changes in his current training cycle so as to not cause other injuries.  

CLIENT is now running pain-free and is back on track to preparing for his upcoming 70.3 triathlon in late August.

plan

CLIENT has been instructed to gradually build mileage leading up to 70.3.  His physical therapist (triathlon/run specialist) is not only guiding him in the management of his injury but also facilitating his training progression so as to not overly stress his muscle/tendon tissue, while at the same time maximizing his body's tolerance to an appropriate mileage build-up that will prepare him for his races.  

CLIENT has also joined our triathlon-specific group strength training sessions on Thursday evenings to further enhance his training.  

Recent Success Stories

Curt:  "This was my fifth full marathon--and a personal best finish--and I was lucky enough to marry the love of my life (also a BE regular) in nearby Yosemite Valley a few days later!  Thanks to the strength training classes at Beyond Exercise, my wife and I were able to hit the trails of Big Sur, Muir Woods and Yosemite National Park right after the marathon without any pain or stiffness.  It was the trip of a lifetime!"

 

 


Lisa:  "I'm finally well enough to run trails after a few sessions with Eric post flying pig injury!"


Kris D flying pig.jpeg

Kris:  "I PR’ed the marathon and felt really strong during the entire race."  

Kris underwent physical therapy for a hip issue.


Alicia:  "With Jen's help, I was able to finish the Missoula half marathon and 5k and then go hiking in Glacier National Park."


Claudia:  "I am going to be a Junior at St. Ursula Academy.  My goal was to further my soccer career playing Division 1 soccer in college.  In May, I verbally committed to play soccer for Ball State University - go Cardinals!  Thanks to BE for helping me achieve my goal!"  

Claudia has been addressing strength and movement weaknesses with our personal trainer/corrective movement specialist.

Running Form Analysis On A Triathlete With Back and Ankle Pain

by Eric Oliver, PT

Background

CLIENT is a triathlete training for his first half-Ironman.  He contacted Beyond Exercise with the goal of identifying faults in his joint mobility, strength, and movement with the hope of managing his intermittent (but chronic) low back pain while at the same time reducing his risk of injury during the rest of his training cycle.  CLIENT has not previously had his running mechanics evaluated nor has he undergone a runner-specific movement and strength evaluation.

Exam Results

The physical exam found movement and strength deficits, and the run analysis revealed that he ran with a forward flexed posture, a long step length, heel strike, and adequate step cadence.  He was given specific exercises to improve upon his weaknesses and to prepare his muscles and tendons for the changes in his running form.  He was also given specific instructions on how to apply the run changes and drills so as to not cause injury to himself.  

Outcome

The follow-up visit was scheduled 1 1/2 weeks later to review his exercises and running form during which an improvement in his running form was noted.  The form drills and one-on-one coaching significantly improved CLIENT's foot strike and posture without change to his cadence.

Reducing his step length and optimizing his posture will aide in reducing stress to the ankle and back.  At the follow-up visit, CLIENT did not report any exacerbation of his symptoms.  Running his normal pace felt easier, but due to muscles working differently he was not able to run his typical duration.

Plan

CLIENT will perform his drills, strength and mobility assignments, and carefully implement the new running changes into his existing training being careful to monitor his body's response.  He will follow-up with the evaluating physical therapist on an as needed basis leading up to his half-Ironman.  We will re-evaluate his body and movement after the race to create a comprehensive off-season training plan that will build from this foundation.

Left image @ Initial Run Analysis.  Right Image @ Follow-up Visit. Left image = Heel strike, long step length.  Right image = Midfoot strike, short step length.  Note: The arm, hand, and left leg are positioned in the exact position for each image, indicating that the image from the follow-up visit was captured at the same initial moment of contact as the image from the initial analysis.

Left image @ Initial Run Analysis.  Right Image @ Follow-up Visit.

Left image = Heel strike, long step length.  Right image = Midfoot strike, short step length.  Note: The arm, hand, and left leg are positioned in the exact position for each image, indicating that the image from the follow-up visit was captured at the same initial moment of contact as the image from the initial analysis.

CLIENT had a step cadence of 180-184 at both the initial evaluation AND at the follow-up visit.  (**Increasing cadence does not always automatically improve your mechanics**)  Cuing and appropriate drill assignments improved his legs' position to transfer force into the ground and to set up a more optimal foot strike with the other leg.

CLIENT had a step cadence of 180-184 at both the initial evaluation AND at the follow-up visit.  (**Increasing cadence does not always automatically improve your mechanics**)  Cuing and appropriate drill assignments improved his legs' position to transfer force into the ground and to set up a more optimal foot strike with the other leg.