Go Keto or No?

Do I think someone can lose weight on the ketogenic diet? Yes. You’re eliminating carbohydrates which retain water in the body, therefore you will lose weight rather quickly in the beginning. But this is water weight, not fat! Also, with the elimination of carbohydrates there is an automatic increase in protein consumption which increases metabolism and helps with weight loss. That's a plus.

Do I think the weight loss from a ketogenic diet is sustainable long term? No. We see time and time again that people with rapid weight loss from low carb diets gain it all back in the long run. I also worry about long-term low carb diets and muscle breakdown. When our glycogen stores are depleted our body can use muscle protein as an energy source. No bueno.

Would I personally recommend the ketogenic diet for weight loss? No. I have heard stories from people who follow the keto diet and claim that they have lost a lot of weight and "feel awesome!" But they also say that the first two weeks are miserable while your body is making the adjustment from running on carbs as its main fuel source to fatty acids ( the dreaded "keto flu"). Brain fog, fatigue, headaches, nausea... no thanks. Not to mention the potential for vitamin and mineral deficiencies when you eliminate fruits and whole grains. And your breath stinks from the ketones. Gross.

Bottom Line: I always encourage people to rely on a general healthy diet and exercise for weight loss. Fad diets don't work long-term and are not necessary for weight loss. You can absolutely lose weight eating fruit, oatmeal, and sweet potatoes. Balance and moderation are key. However, sometimes we need some extra help and support achieving this. Hence, nutrition counseling :)

By Laura Dilz, Registered Dietitian

Learn more about Laura and her services here.

BE's Top 3 Cycling Injuries and Their Causes (Part 3)

BE's Top 3 Cycling Injuries and Their Causes (Part 3)

by Dr. Jen Moehring-Schmidt, PT, DPT, OCS

IT Band Syndrome

Pain in the Iliotibial band (ITB) is a very common, and oftentimes, recurrent complaint of runners, cyclists, and triathletes.  The afflicted athlete will experience pain, sometimes sharp, anywhere along the ITB, which originates on the lateral aspect of the hip, traverses the length of the femur and inserts just below the knee on the outside.  Various muscles along the thigh blend into this thick connective tissue, adding to the complexity of this structure.  

BE's Top 3 Cycling Injuries and Their Causes (Part 2)

BE's Top 3 Cycling Injuries and Their Causes (Part 2)

by Dr. Jen Moehring-Schmidt, PT, DPT, OCS

Lower Back Discomfort

Perhaps the second most common complaint in cycling is lower back pain.  Many of our daily habits, such as sitting for eight or more hours a day, can compromise the correct position of the lumbar spine. Similarly, cycling places the lumbar spine in a forwardly—or flexed posture—and therefore can add stress to the ligaments, discs, muscles and vertebrae that encompass the lumbar spine.  

BE's Top 3 Cycling Injuries and Their Causes (Part 1)

BE's Top 3 Cycling Injuries and Their Causes (Part 1)

by Dr. Jen Moehring-Schmidt, PT, DPT, OCS

While the sport of cycling may not account for as many injuries as football, running, or gymnastics, riding a bike can still be guilty of causing some nagging aches and pains. Sometimes these can be frustrating enough to cause an athlete to reconsider cycling at all! 

Because cycling is primarily a non-impact, non weight-bearing sport, overuse injuries - in the absence of trauma - tend to be less frequent. However, due to the repetitive nature of the sport, cyclists are prone to experience some form of injury at any given time.  As intensity, frequency and duration increase, so do the chances of sustaining an overuse (non-traumatic) injury.  

What To Do If You Get Injured Four Weeks Before Race Day

What To Do If You Get Injured Four Weeks Before Race Day

by Eric Oliver, PT, Founder

During the average training cycle running injuries begin to pop up during the later stages of training more so than at any other point.  By this time in the training program, your body has already endured through hundreds of thousands of steps, and if you have any movement faults, strength deficits, motor sequencing issues, running pattern faults, or issues in your training program your body is likely to react to them.  

Common symptoms of these deficiencies (small or large) include gradual build-up of aches and pains.  These symptoms do not feel the same as general post-workout fatigue or discomfort resulting from the activity.  These are the “this doesn’t feel right” kind of soreness, achiness, burning, jolts, zings, and sharp pains.  Many times these pains don’t gradually build-up, though.  Rather they can come out of nowhere, piercing at your muscle or joint like a hot knife.  In either case, both scenarios will bring your training to a halt or at the least a snails pace. 

6 Steps for a Better Run in the Rain

6 Steps for a Better Run in the Rain

by BE Sponsored Athlete, Amy Robillard

Spring is so exciting for many athletes. We can finally shake those winter blues- and a few layers- while enjoying the fresh air.  Unfortunately, this time of year also brings those dreaded spring showers, which can make for an uncomfortable workout if you’re not prepared.  

We asked two-time Flying Pig Marathon winner, Amy Robillard, for her top tips to survive spring splashes and sprinkles to keep you outside and on schedule.

If you’re dressing for a rainy run, here are some things to consider:

Spring Is Here, And Running Injuries Are In Full Bloom

Spring Is Here, And Running Injuries Are In Full Bloom

by Eric Oliver, PT, Founder

It’s that time of year again.  In Cincinnati, the Heart Mini Marathon opens the running season in mid-March challenging the local winter marathon and half-marathon training groups’ athletes to their first official race of the year’s season.  This race is used as a practice race that helps to propel the runner into the final six weeks of training in which many will see their biggest running distances of the training cycle.  It’s an exciting time because runners get the sense that they are nearing their the big day—Flying Pig day.  In my experience as a physical therapist in Cincinnati, this race has also proved to be a harbinger to the annual ramp-up of pre-Flying Pig injuries.  In light of this year’s rash of injuries coming through our facility, I want to shed some light onto this year’s trainees as they make the last push for the remainder of the training season.  

5 Reasons Why You Might Not Achieve your Fitness Goals

5 Reasons Why You Might Not Achieve your Fitness Goals

by Jason D. Adams, ACSM

Sticking to goals, especially overly ambitious new year’s resolutions, can be difficult.  So, how do we achieve these health and fitness goals that we have set for ourselves?  I’ve identified five major reasons why we stand in the way of achieving our own goals.  Avoid these common pitfalls and keep those goals alive! 

How to Dress for Cold Weather Exercise

How to Dress for Cold Weather Exercise

by BE Sponsored Athlete, Amy Robillard

Dressing for the weather can seem like an ever moving target, especially during the winter. No two cold days are exactly alike, depending on sun, humidity and of course your level of exertion. 

It’s important to stay warm, but not overheat, while layering without adding bulk to your movement. That’s not even taking into consideration the fact that winter conditions can change on a dime.

Below are my top four tips for dressing for your cold weather workout.

Road Cycling Safety

Road Cycling Safety

by Dr. Jen Moehring-Schmidt, PT, DPT, OCS

From the time we were children, bicycles have been a fun, pure and healthy way to engage in physical activity and commute from point A to point B. Most everyone remembers their very first “big kid” bike, and that feeling of flying down a hill with not a single care in the world – at least not in that moment. Bicycles are a symbol of our childhoods, and increasingly for many of us, our adulthoods.

Each year, there is a growing number of bicyclists, ranging anywhere from commuters to weekend warriors to competitive athletes. When I was a kid growing up on a farm, my main objective for the bicycle was to go somewhere faster than I could walk and see things that I was unable to see otherwise. It was a source of freedom, independence and exploration. As time passed, it became a tool for a mental and physical escape during college, and eventually, cycling turned into a competitive sport where much reward was gained from pushing to the limits of aerobic fitness. Many share a similar timeline with cycling, while others may look to bicycling strictly for commuting, family fun or maintaining health.

Whatever your story, your background, one thing is common – and paramount – amongst all people who ride a bike: safety.

Improving Speed And Reducing Injury Risk In Runners

Improving Speed And Reducing Injury Risk In Runners

by Eric Oliver PT, Founder

So how do you make an already fast runner, faster and more resilient to injury?  This was the question with which I was posed earlier this summer when I first met Amy Robillard, the Flying Pig Marathon winner of the past two years.  Amy had already come off a successful spring race season with a female course record at the Run the Bluegrass Half-Marathon in April and a win at the Flying Pig Marathon in May.  When Amy and I first talked she was looking for help with improving her run speed as well as finding answers to her nagging aches and pains.